Marilyn vos Savant Quotes

/Marilyn vos Savant Quotes

Marilyn vos Savant Quotes

  • A good idea will keep you awake during the morning, but a great idea will keep you awake during the night.

  • A person who learns to juggle six balls will be more skilled than the person who never tries to juggle more than three.

  • Although spoken English doesn’t obey the rules of written language, a person who doesn’t know the rules thoroughly is at a great disadvantage.

  • At first, I only laughed at myself. Then I noticed that life itself is amusing. I’ve been in a generally good mood ever since.

  • Attention-deficit disorders seem to abound in modern society, and we don’t know the cause.

  • Avoid using cigarettes, alcohol, and drugs as alternatives to being an interesting person.

  • Be able to analyze statistics, which can be used to support or undercut almost any argument.

  • Be able to back up a car for a considerable distance in a straight line and back out of a driveway.

  • Be able to blow out a dinner candle without sending wax flying across the table.

  • Be able to cite three good qualities of every relative or acquaintance that you dislike.

  • Be able to confide your innermost secrets to your mother and your innermost fears to your father.

  • Be able to correctly pronounce the words you would like to speak and have excellent spoken grammar.

  • Be able to decline a date so gracefully that the person isn’t embarrassed that he or she asked.

  • Be able to defend your arguments in a rational way. Otherwise, all you have is an opinion.

  • Be able to describe anything visual, such as a street scene, in words that convey your meaning.

  • Be able to draw an illustration as least well enough to get your point across to another person.

  • Be able to go shopping for a bathing suit and not become depressed afterward.

  • Be able to hiccup silently, or at least without alerting neighbors to your situation. The first hiccup is an exception.

  • Be able to identify the most common breeds of dogs and cats on sight.

  • Be able to keep a secret or promise when you know in your heart that it is the right thing to do.

  • Be able to live alone, even if you don’t want to and think you will never find it necessary.

  • Be able to meet any deadline, even if your work is done less well than it would be if you had all the time you would have preferred.

  • Be able to notice all the confusion between fact and opinion that appears in the news.

  • Be able to read blueprints, diagrams, floorplans, and other diagrams used in the construction process.

  • Be able to recognize many of the major constellations and know the stories behind them.

  • Be able to recognize the dangerous snakes, spiders, insects, and plants that live in your area of the country.

  • Be able to recognize when you’re reading or hearing material biased to your own side.

  • Be able to sneeze without sounding ridiculous. That means neither stifling yourself or spraying your immediate vicinity.

  • Be able to suffer wearing a necktie or slightly high heels for an entire evening without complaint or early removal.

  • Be able to tell whether garments that look good on the hanger actually look good on you.

  • Be in the habit of experimenting with your clothing so that you don’t get stuck for life with a self-image developed over the course of high school.

  • Be in the habit of getting up bright and early on the weekends. Why waste such precious time in bed?

  • Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.

  • Capital punishment is the source of many an argument, both good and bad.

  • Email, instant messaging, and cell phones give us fabulous communication ability, but because we live and work in our own little worlds, that communication is totally disorganized.

  • Evolution has long been the target of illogical arguments that use presumption.

  • Experts say you can’t concentrate on more than one task at a time.

  • Have enough sense to know, ahead of time, when your skills will not extend to wallpapering.

  • Have you ever noticed that when you must struggle to hear something, you close your eyes?

  • I believe that one can indeed work on two or more tasks at once, but in ways yet to be understood.

  • I suspect that some apparently homosexual people are really heterosexuals who deeply phobic about the opposite sex or have other emotional problems.

  • I think change is possible, but only for individuals who were never truly gay in the first place and who have a strong personal motivation to recover their heterosexuality.

  • I would not encourage children or teens to multitask because we don’t know where those efforts may lead.

  • If your head tells you one thing, and your heart tells you another, before you do anything, you should first decide whether you have a better head or a better heart.

  • Know about the appeals process, especially in the case of the most serious crimes.

  • Know how and how much to tip people who expect gratuities, even in the case of poor service.

  • Know how to behave at a buffet. Take a clean plate for a second helping.

  • Know how to behave at a fine restaurant, which is a telltale measure of social maturity.

  • Know how to drive safely when it’s raining or when it’s snowing. The two conditions are different.

  • Know how to effectively voice a complaint or make a claim at a retail store.

  • Know how to garnish food so that it is more appealing to the eye and even more flavorful than before.

  • Know how to travel from your town to a nearby town without a car, either by bus or by rail.

  • Know how to treat frostbite until you can get indoors.

  • Know how weather, especially humidity, can affect the movement of doors and windows.

  • Know how your representatives stand on major national or state issues.

  • Know the difference between principles based on right or wrong vs. principles based on personal gain, and consider the basis of your own principles.

  • Know the function of a fuse box and the appearance of a tripped circuit breaker.

  • Know the names of past and current artists who are most famous for playing their instruments.

  • Know the official post office abbreviations for all 50 states without having to consult a list.

  • Know what happens when an individual declares bankruptcy and how it affects his or her life.

  • Know what to do if you feel faint or dizzy, especially if you might fall and hit your head.

  • Know where to find the sunrise and sunset times and note how the sky looks at those times, at least once.

  • Know which officials are voted into office and which are appointed, and by whom.

  • Know why certain foods, such as truffles, are expensive. It’s not because they taste best.

  • Learn at least two classic ballroom dances, at least one of them Latin.

  • Make a habit of canceling every subscription to anything you don’t have time to read.

  • Many people feel they must multi-task because everybody else is multitasking, but this is partly because they are all interrupting each other so much.

  • Multi-tasking arises out of distraction itself.

  • No one would choose to be jerked randomly off task again and again until you have half a dozen things you’re trying to get done, all at the same time.

  • People who work crossword puzzles know that if they stop making progress, they should put the puzzle down for a while.

  • Play more than one game at a time. This is a painless way to learn how to do many things at once.

  • Scientists and creationists are always at odds, of course.

  • Skill is successfully walking a tightrope between the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center. Intelligence is not trying.

  • Society needs people who can manage projects in addition to handling individual tasks.

  • Spending waiting moments doing crossword puzzles or reading a book you brought yourself.

  • Success is achieved by developing our strengths, not by eliminating our weaknesses.

  • Teens think listening to music helps them concentrate. It doesn’t. It relieves them of the boredom that concentration on homework induces.

  • The chess player who develops the ability to play two dozen boards at a time will benefit from learning to compress his or her analysis into less time.

  • The difference between talking on your cell phone while driving and speaking with a passenger is huge. The person on the other end of the cell phone is chattering away, oblivious.

  • The freedom to be an individual is the essence of America.

  • The length of your education is less important than its breadth, and the length of your life is less important than its depth.

  • To acquire knowledge, one must study; but to acquire wisdom, one must observe.

  • Understand why casinos and racetracks stay in business – the gambler always loses over the long term.

  • What is the essence of America? Finding and maintaining that perfect, delicate balance between freedom “to” and freedom “from.”

  • When our spelling is perfect, it’s invisible. But when it’s flawed, it prompts strong negative associations.

  • While you’re writing, you can’t concentrate nearly as well on what the speaker is saying.

  • Working in an office with an array of electronic devices is like trying to get something done at home with half a dozen small children around. The calls for attention are constant.
  • By | 2010-11-27T10:35:39+00:00 November 13th, 2010|Uncategorized|0 Comments

    About the Author:

    Leave A Comment